Who’s the Bigger Fish to Fry: Chen or Morrison?

According to the April 19 sdcexec.com article regarding the ‘2016 Compliance Risk Report: CCOs under scrutiny,’ nearly one-third of compliance officers are extremely concerned about their personal liability in misconduct investigations. With a majority, over 80% of survey respondents being at least somewhat apprehensive of taking a position as a CCO, especiialy in the private sector, could possibly “destroy your career or personal life,” replied one current Corporate Compliance Officer.

The main points of the 2016 CRR hit on the Justice Department’s appointing Hui Chen as first compliance counsel and the Yates Memo, a plan to hold individual corporate employees accountable and prosecution, if fitting, as well as incentivizing reform. US Government seems to be focusing on punishing any and everyone involved in corporate misconduct in any way.

One such CCO, Helane Morrison, seems to be untouchable in this situation. Always above board, and willing to go above and beyond the call of duty, Morrison has the tendency and sill to run with the ‘big dogs.’

Helane Morrison joined Hall Capital Partners, LLC in November 2007, and has climbed ranks to her current position(s) of Managing Director, General Counsel, and Chief Compliance Officer. Before her joining Hall Capital, Morrison was responsible for security and enforcement matters for Northern California and five Northwestern states, as Regional Director of the SEC from 1999- late 2007. In this position, she handled both the enforcement and examinations within the San Francisco jurisdiction). Preceding her stint with the SEC, Helane Morrison spent her career practicing law in her private practice, trying cases for Contra Costa ADA, and serving as a law clerk for Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, among her many other accomplishments.

Helane Morrison has spent her career climbing the ladder, and is doing so, has managed to collect achievement after achievement. Her trophy cabinet is jam packed, and includes titles such as Director of the Bar Association of San Francisco (BASF), member of Board of Regional Parks Foundation, and participant of Board of Directors of the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law Alumni Association, just to name a few. With credentials like these, and the backing of so many, Ms. Morrison need not have a worry of the 2016 CRR or the results of the survey; Helane cannot just run with the big dogs, she IS the big dog!

Andy Wirth – Finds Relief From Policital Incorporation

Several years in the past for Lake Tahoe’s north shore communities have provided a tough stigma of events that have severely impacted the famous ski resort. They have witnessed and been the victim of a serious drought that has put a damper on the winter activities as well as the flow of traffic to the resort. Thankfully, they received an early winter storm that has passed through the area leaving a lot of snow and cold weather, allowing the Squaw Valley Resort to open earlier. This has allowed the winter activities to begin, and allowed the resort to get a jump start on the winter season. The other hold up they had going on was the efforts enforced by the political incorporation. Andy Wirth, who is the president and CEO has fought hard against their efforts and opposes their findings. Luckily, they have recently withdrawn their efforts which has created a huge relief for the Squaw Valley Resort staff and the CEO, Andy Wirth.

Andy Wirth has pretty much always been a part of the outdoor world. He is from Germany but moved to Colorado at a young age to attend the Colorado State University. After graduating from the university, he moved to Steamboat, where he worked there at the resort for a number of years. He has family that have worked in the outdoor world as well, so he has been very familiar with the outdoor enthusiasts and their need for activities. He took over the Squaw Valley Resort and since then has worked very hard to make some serious improvements that would be very beneficial to the resort. He is currently working on building a gondola that would result in linking the two sister resorts together. The skier’s would have the ability to visit bother winter resorts by using the device to get back and forth. The construction project for the gondola is set to go soon. He has also been a huge contributor to the environmental and community service organization. He has always been fairly focused on making the environment better for those of all ages. After surviving a very serious sky diving accident, it impacted his life in a positive way. He has been a active activist for the Wounded Warrior Support charity. He founded the program to help Navy Seals after the return home from duty to be with their families.

Wirth felt that the political incorporation and their efforts within the community would be a “recipe for disaster.” In the future, he hopes that they can move on from this and work together to ensure that the community becomes a better place. Although there has been some divisive comments, he hopes they can move past for a chance of healing.

Source: the Reno-Gazette Journal

Yeonmi Park and Her Escape from North Korea

Yeonmi Park, a high-profile activist, spoke to the press last Saturday about the experiences that she and her mother lived when residing and escaping North Korea.

Park, who currently is 21 years old, resides in New York. And she recently published a book titled, “In Order to Live,” which narrates the events that led to North Korea’s downfall and experiences lived by Park and her mother.

According to nk news.org Park, North Korea begin to decline after the fall of the Soviet Union. This caused then, the non-communist Soviet Union, to radically change its policies in trades.
North Korea was dependent on Soviet Union on many aspects, especially food. North Korea eventually fell into famine, and such events Park remembers them clearly.

Park remembers that at one point, she and her family members had to consume for example plants, like grasses and flowers, and insects. Eating crickets or butterflies had become the norm. People were starving, and the then estate of Kim Jong-il showed no mercy on revolts. Countless North Korean citizens either died by execution or starvation. Park remembers seeing piles of dead bodies on the streets.

People eventually tried to leave the country, risking their lives and risking getting put in prision. Park’s father was not an exception and ended up in jail as well.

The absence of a father in the family made conditions worse; thus, Park’s mother, in desperation and need, also opted to escape. She convinced a Chinese trafficker to cross her to China, a task that seemed practically impossible.

Park recalls that she and her mother had to walk countless distances and cross the Yalu river, which is known for its dangerousness. She remembers too how she, her mother, and the man dodged the guards at the border. But the hard journey did not end when they were finally able to arrive safely in China. The trafficker sexually abused Park’s mother as soon as they arrived at Chinese soil.

The sexual abuses continued as long as they resided in the trafficker’s house in china. Park continuously witnessed her mother getting rapped by the man. She was 13 years old at the time, and such moments have marked her life.

Eventually, after two years, the trafficker awolled Park and her mom to go. They headed towards mongolia. And as soon as they arrived, they took a flight to South Korea.

Park is on the mission of raising awareness of the conditions that the the North Koreans are undergoing. She has travelled all over the world and has been on many events, recently at the Women in the World Summit 2015.